Scars of History

Esi Edugyan, Rawi Hage, Alix Hawley

Scars of History

Moderator: Kathryn Gretsinger

Event Number: 74

Free or by donation

Scars of History

Esi Edugyan, Rawi Hage, Alix Hawley

Saturday, October 20
8:00pm
Waterfront Theatre

1412 Cartwright St, Vancouver

From shops operating out of half-shelled buildings to remnants of slave-trading blocks in city centres: some marks of our volatile history are visible. Others are hidden but no less insidious. Historical events make for some of the most compelling novels from modern writers, helping us better understand the complex lives of our forebears. Esi Edugyan (Washington Black), Rawi Hage (Beirut Hellfire Society) and Alix Hawley (My Name Is a Knife) share why they interpret history through their fiction and how the power of art can help us reassess our modern age. Sharing tales of the Deep South pre-abolition, the Lebanese Civil War, and the American frontier where Indigenous and white communities clash, these authors will spellbind and inform.

Kathryn Gretsinger is the lead instructor in UBC’s Integrated Journalism program for which she has been recognized with the Killam Teaching Prize.

Event Participants:

Esi Edugyan

Esi Edugyan

British Columbia

Esi Edugyan is author of the novels The Second Life of Samuel Tyne and Half-Blood Blues, which won the Scotiabank Giller Prize, and was a finalist for the Man Booker Prize, the Governor General’s Literary Award, the Rogers Writers’ Trust Prize, and the Orange Prize. In 2014, she published her first book of nonfiction, Dreaming of Elsewhere: Observations on Home. Her latest novel, Washington Black, was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize. She lives in Victoria, British Columbia with her husband and two children.

Rawi Hage

Rawi Hage

Quebec

Rawi Hage’s first novel, De Niro’s Game, won the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and his follow up work, Cockroach, was the winner of the Paragraphe Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction. Both novels were shortlisted for every major Canadian literary prize, including the Rogers Trust Fiction Prize, the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor General’s Award for fiction. With Beirut Hellfire Society, he makes a stunning and mature return to war torn Beirut of the 1970s, during the Civil War.

 

Alix Hawley

British Columbia

Alix Hawley studied at Oxford University, the University of East Anglia, and the University of British Columbia. Her story collection, The Old Familiar, was longlisted for the ReLit Award, and two of her pieces have won CBC Literary Prizes. Her first novel, All True Not a Lie in It, was longlisted for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, and won the Amazon.ca First Novel Award and the BC Book Prize for Fiction. Her latest novel is My Name is a Knife.

alixhawley.com, @alixhawley