Incite: November 23

Incite

7:30pm on Wednesday, November 23
Admission is free*
Alice MacKay room, Central Library

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Ray Robertson discusses his latest work of non-fiction, Why Not? Fifteen Reasons to Live and writers Cathy Stonehouse and Rebecca Rosenblum read from their latest short story collections Something About the Animal and The Big Dream.

*Please let us know you are attending by registering in advance. Please note that registration is so that we know how many people to expect. Admission on the night is always on a first-come-first-served basis.

 

The Writers

Ray Robertson

Ray Robertson

Ray Robertson's Why Not? Fifteen Reasons to Live is a thoughtful and searching yet always witty and entertaining book-length exploration of life’s central and enduring question: What makes life worth living?

Robertson uses both autobiographical incident and the rich written reserve that is Western art and philosophy to locate the logical and emotional sources for a deeper, more profound understanding and appreciation of human existence.

Why Not? Fifteen Reasons to Live is a wonderfully engaging collection of essays in praise of such perennial human pleasures as art, love, solitude, and intoxication in which Robertson's own experiences and ideas are elegantly interwoven with those of various artists, philosophers, and thinkers. The result is a book that is not only absorbing and enlightening, but amusing and enlivening as well.

 

Cathy Stonehouse

Cathy Stonehouse

In Something About the Animal, Cathy Stonehouse’s first collection of short fiction, the world is coming apart at the seams. These are stories of imminent crisis, which tread the hysterical edge of madness in a way few writers have managed; stories about the search for meaning, about haunted understanding, and about real life horror; stories that are bleakly, blackly funny, imbued with generosity, and possessed of great beauty.

 

Rebecca Rosenblum

Rebecca Rosenblum

In The Big Dream, acclaimed short story writer Rebecca Rosenblum documents a new generation coming of age in the workplace. With its transparent, biting, understated prose, The Big Dream is an In Our Time for the twenty-first century.