Incite: Adèle Barclay, Aislinn Hunter, Richard Harrison, Cecily Nicholson

Presented by the Vancouver Writers Fest and Vancouver Public Library

Incite: Adèle Barclay, Aislinn Hunter, Richard Harrison, Cecily Nicholson

Tickets

(price does not include service charge)

Free – RSVP to let us know you’re coming

Wednesday, January 24
7:30pm
Alice McKay Room - Vancouver Public Library
350 W. Georgia Street, Vancouver

For the first event of Incite’s 2018 season, we’ll hear from four award-winning poets, each reading from and discussing critically-acclaimed collections. Adèle Barclay’s If I Were In A Cage I’d Reach Out For You (Nightwood Editions) received the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize in 2016. An evocative, radically intimate collection, a strong desire to ‘reach out’ runs palpably through these poems. Aislinn Hunter’s Linger, Still (Gaspereau Press) ranges across ecological, philosophical, domestic, and literary subjects. Along the way, these startling poems reach for, and grasp, “what lists under every pose: the hope / that someone will love us”. Richard Harrison‘s On Not Losing My Father’s Ashes in the Flood (Wolsak & Wynn) reflects on his father’s death, the Alberta Flood, and what poetry offers a life lived around it. A 2017 Governor General’s Award-winning collection, it was named “undoubtedly among the most searing poetry of 2016,” by Marrow Reviews. Lastly, Vancouver poet Cecily Nicholson will read from Wayside Sang (Talon Books), a collection that explores transportation and migration through various landscapes.

Free – RSVP to let us know you’re coming

Presented by the Vancouver Writers Fest with support from the Downtown Vancouver Business Improvement Association and the Vancouver Courier.

Event Authors:

Incite: Adèle Barclay, Aislinn Hunter, Richard Harrison, Cecily Nicholson

Adèle Barclay

Adèle Barclay’s writing has appeared in The Fiddlehead, The Puritan, PRISM, The Walrus, and elsewhere. She is the recipient of the 2016 Lit POP Award for Poetry and the The Walrus’ 2016 Readers’ Choice Award for Poetry and has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Her debut poetry collection, If I Were in a Cage I’d Reach Out for You,(Nightwood, 2016) won the 2017 Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize. She is an editor for Rahila’s Ghost Press, a poetry ambassador for Vancouver’s Poet Laureate Rachel Rose, and the 2017 Critic-in-Residence for Canadian Women In Literary Arts. She teaches at UBC.

Incite: Adèle Barclay, Aislinn Hunter, Richard Harrison, Cecily Nicholson

Richard Harrison

Richard Harrison’s eight books include the Governor General’s Award–finalist Big Breath of a Wish, and Hero of the Play, the first book of poetry launched at the Hockey Hall of Fame. He teaches English and Creative Writing at Calgary’s Mount Royal University, a position he took up after being the Distinguished Writer-in-Residence at the University of Calgary in 1995. His work has been published, broadcast and displayed around the world, and his poems have been translated into French, Spanish, Portuguese and Arabic. In On Not Losing My Father’s Ashes in the Flood, which received the Governor General’s Literary Award for Poetry in 2017, Richard reflects on his father’s death, the Alberta Flood and what poetry offers a life lived around it.

Incite: Adèle Barclay, Aislinn Hunter, Richard Harrison, Cecily Nicholson

Aislinn Hunter

Aislinn Hunter is an award-winning poet and novelist and the author of seven books. Her most recent book – Linger, Still – features poems on everything from taxidermy to Vancouver’s urban sprawl. Hunter holds an MSc in Writing and Cultural Politics and a PhD from the University of Edinburgh where she studied resonance and material culture. She teaches creative writing part-time at Kwantlen Polytechnic University.

Incite: Adèle Barclay, Aislinn Hunter, Richard Harrison, Cecily Nicholson

Cecily Nicholson

Cecily Nicholson, from small-town Ontario via Toronto and South Bend, relocated to the Pacific coast almost two decades ago. On Musqueam-, Squamish-, and Tsleil-Waututh-occupied lands known as Vancouver, she has worked, since 2000, in the Downtown Eastside neighbourhood, most recently as administrator for the artist-run centre and mental health resource, Gallery Gachet. A part of the Joint Effort prison abolitionist group and a member of the Research Ethics Board for Emily Carr University of Art and Design, Cecily was also the 2017 Ellen Warren Tallman Writer in Residence at Simon Fraser University. She is the author of Triage and From the Poplars, winner of the 2015 Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize.